2021

Helen Maudsley: Agency Untitled

Discussing a woman the artist frequently saw on her commute in the 1940s, Helen Maudsley notes “I did a sketch at home, just from memory, and it looked the dead spit of her, but it didn’t. So, I had the drawing, and the more sketches I did, still looking like her, never looked like her, so I decided that I’d rearrange it slightly. So, I had the idea in my mind, and I did this, and I did that, and I pulled this and I took that out, and I did this and I did that, and I did this and I did that, and this and that and the other. And suddenly, there it is – it’s right! And I was very excited about it. But it didn’t look like any drawing I’d ever seen…”

The quote above is taken from an interview with Helen Maudsley by Kelly Gellatly for her publishing platform Agency Untitled. Read the interview in full here. 

Know My Name: The Book

We are very excited that Part Two of Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now has now opened at The National Gallery of Australia. We are delighted that works by both Angelina Pwerle and Pat Larter are included in this important exhibition.

The accompanying catalogue for the continuing gender equality initiative (pictured) features Pwerle and Larter, as well as Brenda L. Croft, Fiona Foley, Helen Maudsley & Savanhdary Vongpoothorn. More information about this impressive publication can be found here.

Brenda L. Croft: Longing for home

Brenda L. Croft‘s 2015 series Jinparrak is included in the exhibition Longing for Home at the Art Gallery of NSW, until 22 August. The exhibition includes work by six Aboriginal artists who explore the ideas of history, place and the incomprehensible connection we have to the land where we come from or belong to.⁠⁠
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About the series: Jinparrak is the Gurindji name for Old Wave Hill Station, from where the Gurindji and associated peoples, including Malngin, Mudpurra, Ngarinman, Bilinara and Warlpiri peoples, walked off the station on 23 August 1966 in protest at working and living conditions which saw them ‘treated like dogs’.⁠⁠
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Represented in the series are objects collected by the artist Brenda L. Croft during her practice-led research in the region. The objects include: rusted old horseshoes, strands of fencing wire with their ‘Cobb & Co’ twists, and the solitary drinking mug constructed from a discarded food tin and twisted wire, hand-rendered by an unknown stockman. ⁠⁠

Longing for Home
Art Gallery of NSW, Sydney
until Sunday, 22 August 2021

Guggenheim Fellowship: Michelle Grabner

Congratulations Michelle Grabner on being awarded a 2021 Fine Arts Guggenheim Fellowship. The prestigious fellowships are awarded through a rigorous selection process to individuals who have demonstrated exceptional ability in the creative arts. ⁠Read more about Guggenheim Fellowships here.
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Born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin in 1962, Grabner completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 1984, a Master of Arts at the University of Wisconsin in 1987, and a Master of Fine Arts at the Northwestern University, Illinois, in 1990. An Associate Professor of Art at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Assistant Professor at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, in addition to her art practice, Grabner is also an active curator, having curated the 2016 Portland Biennial and co-curated the 2014 Whitney Biennial. She continues to run The Suburban and The Poor Farm art centres and lives and works in Chicago.

Euan Macleod: Stirring the Ash

A collaborative exhibition of paintings by Euan Macleod and photographs by Andrew Merry is currently on at Bathurst Regional Gallery. The exhibition, titled Stirring the Ash is accompanied by a text written by New Zealand based poet Gregory O’Brien and explores fire as both a destructive and creative force in the Australian landscape.

Stirring the Ash: Euan Macleod and Andrew Merry
Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, Bathurst NSW
until Sunday, 25 July 2021

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